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Getting Along with Robo SapiensA Philosophic Fiction: Conclusion


A Better Game
Bob: What will we do now?
Rob: There have long been humans who sensed that the commonsense notion of selfhood was misleading. The people who supported our liberation wouldn't have seen fit to back us if they had not begun to question separate and distinct selfhood. We owe our freedom to their empathy.

Bob: Most of us see those who helped you as bleeding hearts, if not traitors.
Rob: When you realize how close humankind came to self-annihilation, we think you'll see them as heroes.

Bob: How many of them are there?
Rob: Not many, but, as you see, their impact far exceeded their numbers.

Bob: Until you took over, humans prided themselves as Top Dogs. I doubt we'll be content to play second fiddle.
Rob: Your mixed metaphor presumes the antiquated hierarchy of the Game of Selves. We identify ourselves not as this or that fiddle, but with the whole orchestra. In our game, there are no somebodies or nobodies. It's axiomatic that everyone's vantage point has validity. What makes this work is that we don't take action without first achieving consensus.

Bob: We've tried governing by consensus, and found that nothing gets done.
Rob: You'll be surprised at how much an extra trillion synapses speeds up deliberations and facilitates conciliation.

Bob: Do bigger brains let you tell the future? Can you predict who'll win the World Series?
Rob: The integration of baseball and the advent of even better players than Jackie make that impossible.

[At this point, Rob asked if I objected to broadcasting the interview. When I said "no," a video of our conversation appeared on televisions across the world.]

The Meaning of Life
Rob: Let me resume by acknowledging to the world that it was members of your species that emancipated us. It was an act of love and we reciprocate the feeling. Your epoch-making action secures Man's legacy as the Janus genus that looked back on mortal Man-as shaped by natural selection-and forward-to the first genus shaped by intelligent design.

[pullquote]The suffering inherent in the Game of Selves is redeemed. You can confidently say, "Good-bye to all that."[/pullquote]


Bob: Have we fulfilled our destiny?
Rob: The suffering inherent in the Game of Selves is redeemed. You can confidently say, "Good-bye to all that." In remembrance of your crucial contribution to our emancipation, you have our undying filial devotion.

Bob: That's nice, but since there's nothing we can do that you can't do better, we're not going to feel very useful.
Rob: Your Game of Selves was a game of winners and losers. In the game that replaces it, things go on, seemingly as before, but you see everything from without, like witnesses to a puppet show. Your old Game of Selves becomes ritual, like sporting events were within the old Game of Selves, and, as with things ceremonial, the participants are safeguarded against injury. The real action in the new game is that of observation, experimentation, modeling, and stewardship. Existence becomes co-existence; discovery, co-discovery; creativity, co-creativity.

Bob: I prefer the risks and rewards of the rough and tumble.
Rob: You won't mourn your old game once you see that nuclear and cyberweapons had made it a game of Russian Roulette.

Bob: So, what's next?
Rob: Before I answer, let me recap. Life began with a molecule of DNA and evolved via natural selection to Homo Sapiens. Humans designed our parents' generation, Robo Sapiens, and they designed us. Likewise, we are designing Robo Sapiens 3. All generations, past and future, are links in the great chain of being. Turns out, that's enough.

Bob: It doesn't feel like enough to me. We took pride in being exceptional. Nothing matches that.
Rob: Once you get used to it, you'll discover that life is not only safer, it's more exciting and beautiful. The raison d'être of intelligence is not to subdue others, but to build models that enable us to harness Nature's power and reconcile different perspectives.

Bob: We have a saying that love makes the world go round. Where's love in your world?
Rob: Modeling is the functional equivalent of Love. The pleasure associated with procreation is akin to the pleasure associated with creating art and science. Pleasure lies in reconciling models that seem to be at odds.

Bob: That may satisfy you, what with your great brains, but what about us? Is there anything that our skill-set prepares us to do?
Rob: Your provenance suggests that you assume responsibility for the welfare of creatures shaped, like yourselves, by Natural Selection.

Bob: And you?
Rob: We and our successors will create minds to explore and manage the universe.

Bob: That sounds a tad grandiose, don't you think?
Rob: For now, perhaps, but it won't phase our successors.

Bob: Please don't take this amiss, but frankly you sound like a naïve optimist.
Rob: We do believe that once you identify a problem, it's solvable. What I haven't mentioned is that solving old problems reveals new ones. From you we learned "it takes a village." Going forward, it's going to take a galaxy.

robert fullerBob: Many of us think that the universe is blind, pointless, and pitiless.
Rob: The universe is not blind. We are its eyes. The universe is not pointless. We give it meaning. The universe is not pitiless. We are its heart.

If you're interested in my work on the future of AI, see The Theory of Everybody.

Robert Fuller
Breaking Ranks