Posted with permission from WND

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WASHINGTON – A Baton Rouge police officer left permanently disabled after a black separatist killed three policemen and injured three more in a shootout is now suing Black Lives Matter for inciting violence across the United States, and one author thinks this may be the lawsuit that puts to an end the violent BLM movement.

The suit, filed by an anonymous victim of the gunman's deadly ambush on police, names Deray Mckesson and four other Black Lives Matter leaders as defendants.

Mckesson, who has met with former President Obama in the White House, is a prominent organizer for Black Lives Matter.

Gavin Long, a 29-year-old Marine, targeted police outside a convenience store near the Baton Rouge police headquarters in July 2016, opening fire with a semi-automatic rifle. He was killed after a shootout with police.

"Anyone who remembers how the Southern Poverty Law Center made its bones will rejoice at the news of this lawsuit," Colin Flaherty, author of "White Girl Bleed A Lot," told WND.

"The SPLC sued the [Klu Klux Klan] and won a large judgment because it convinced a jury that the Klan was fomenting violence around the country. Whatever the Klan did, however the Klan did it, it is plain to see that Black Lives Matter encourages the same violence with two big differences: 1) People actually listened to BLM. 2) There was tons and tons of violence associated with BLM activities all over the country."

Flaherty added both Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders supported BLM or used BLM talking points during the 2016 election.

"And they were not hiding anything: Just the opposite, violence against police was one of their major themes," Flaherty said. "They called it self-defense, and they were successful in convincing a large number of their members that attacking police was just fine because it was self-defense or retribution."

Flaherty, who has extensively studied and documented the violence committed by BLM, believes the damage from BLM riots is "beyond calculation."

"In Baltimore, more than 60 business owners are filing the same kind of suit against the city, saying the city encouraged – then allowed – large-scale black mob violence against their business," Flaherty said, adding, "I would love to sit on this jury."

Long had said he wanted to "bring the same destruction that bad cops continue to inflict upon my people, upon bad cops as well as good cops in hopes that the good cops (which are the majority) will be able to stand together to enact justice and punishment against bad cops."

Before the attack, Long searched online for the addresses of police officers involved in the fatal shooting of Alton Sterling, a black man killed by police outside a store in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

It's never been tougher to be one of the men in blue than it is right now. Get "The War On Police: How the Ferguson Effect Is Making America Unsafe" now at the WND Superstore

Sterling's death fueled Black Lives Matter protests across the country, and led to a local protest in Baton Rouge that saw nearly 200 people arrested.

The recently filed lawsuit notes that DeRay Mckesson was "in charge" of the Baton Rouge protests, and reports that the protest "turned into a riot."

Rather than work to calm the crowd, Mckesson allegedly incited the protesters to riot and commit violence, the suit claims.

The suit further claims that Black Live Matters leaders encourage violence against police generally, especially "in retaliation for the death of black men killed by police."

"I'm very intrigued by this lawsuit and anxious to see how the courts rule on it," said Jeff Roorda, a retired police officer and a four-term Missouri state representative who currently works for the St. Louis Police Officers Association. "We have a balancing test in the courts in this country that weighs the importance of free speech against the recklessness of dishonest, dangerous words.

"It'll be interesting to see if the court holds BLM and its leaders to the same standards that the rest of we Americans are held to."

Before Long's shooting in Baton Rouge, Micah Xavier Johnson killed five police officers and injured nine others in another allegedly Black Lives Matter-inspired attack in Dallas, Texas.

Johnson claimed he was angry over police killings of black men and stated he wanted to kill white people, namely white police officers, according to Dallas Police Chief David Brown.

Barack Obama claimed at the time that it was "very hard to untangle the motives" surrounding the Dallas attack.

"The so-called random violence against police officers in Dallas, Baton Rouge, and so many other places isn't random at all," Roorda, author of "The War on Police: How the Ferguson Effect is Making America Unsafe," told WND. "This hate-inspired violence based on the ‘hands-up, don't shoot' lie has to stop."

Johnson's social media included an image with the slogan "Black Power," and he had expressed interest in the Facebook page of the New Black Panther Party, the Washington Post reports.

The plaintiff in the case is reportedly a 42-year-old father of two and an 18-year veteran of law enforcement.

The plaintiff was left with brain damage after being shot by Long, and only recently emerged from a vegetative state.

The suit asks for at least $75,000 in damages.

This is the second lawsuit filed against Mckesson by a Baton Rouge police officer.

A previously filed lawsuit claims that Mckesson was responsible for injuries sustained by police during the Baton Rouge protests. A federal judge has yet to rule on whether the lawsuit will move forward.

Mckesson himself was arrested during the Alton Sterling protests, but charges were never brought against him.

"The truth is that cops are getting shot and killed by the same criminals who are committing the black-on-black violence that plagues our inner cities," Roorda believes.

‘Let's stop pretending that those who turn violence against the protectors of our most vulnerable are some sort of martyrs. They're not. They're just murderers."

It's never been tougher to be one of the men in blue than it is right now. Get "The War On Police: How the Ferguson Effect Is Making America Unsafe" now at the WND Superstore