Posted with permission from allAfrica.com

The founder of the Liberia Diabetes Center (LDC) in Monrovia, Mr. James Momoh, says diabetes is a silent killer in the country and therefore, the Government of Liberia and international partners should prioritize diabetes awareness.

In a telephone interview with the Daily Observer from his base in the United States, Mr. Momoh said diabetes is now a global disease and one of the leading causes of death and disability. He said diabetes is claiming lives in the country due to lack of awareness about the disease, its management, and prevention.

"With comprehensive awareness by all medical institutions in the country, the lives of many diabetics could be prolonged," he said. "Diabetes has three stages, but Type 2 is the most prevalent in Liberia."

He said people often develop Type 2 diabetes due to the lack of an active lifestyle or when the disease runs in the family. "People that find themselves in this category of the disease always have the advantage of eliminating or diverting the disease path through radical lifestyle changes in combination with medication," Momoh indicated. "Unlike Type 2 diabetes, Type 1, which is acquired at birth, is the most complex of the disease."

Momoh said because of the disease (Type 2) in the county, it will require the concerted effort of the Government of Liberia and international partners to get involved in a robust awareness initiative on the disease's prevention and management. "Diabetes can't be fought by the Liberia Diabetes Center alone," he said, "it will require the effort of everyone, including our international partners."

On the engagement of the Liberia Diabetes Center in the fight against diabetes in Liberia, he said the center is playing a pivotal role in diabetes awareness in the country and for the last two years, it has provided testing and other health assessment opportunities to people that are living with diabetes.

"Since the establishment of the diabetes center in Liberia, the lives of diabetics have been transformed from hopelessness to hopeful through the center's comprehensive awareness initiative," Momoh said.